Disappearing eagles

Why is there such a need to defend this system of land management with such ignorance and stupidity? Why the desperation to maintain this denuded, denatured topography, while presenting it as the outcome of responsible husbandry, sensible economy and dutiful custodianship of the land?

Even under the influence of testosterone suppressing medication, the disappearance of two satellite tagged eagles within a few hours of each other at the same location snaps my twig, and briefly I get the urge to hurt somebody or damage stuff. Thankfully I am aware of this, but there is evidently something quite visceral, yet cold and calculating about the reactions I observe in myself. Apart from the sheer rage associated with cruelty and killing animals for fun, there is more a general fury penetrating deep into the bit of me that identifies as Scottish. Even without the natural motivation of hormones, I want to act now, decisively, to bring an end to this wickedness, see the perpetrators punished severely.

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The revolution will (not) be televised

For the last four or five years great changes have been underway in this country. These began to make their presence felt at the end of 2014 in the aftermath of the Scottish independence referendum, as there arose again, especially but not exclusively in England, a familiar strain of nationalism, which confuses the meanings of the words British and English and believes it is naturally superior to others and therefore entitled to special treatment.

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Cycle four and some politics

At bottom, the problem of political decision-making only redoubles and displaces to a collective scale what is already an illusion in the individual: the belief that our actions, our thoughts, our gestures, our words, and our behaviours result from decisions emanating from a central, conscious, and sovereign entity – the Self.

Being on the left or on the right is to choose among one of the countless ways afforded to humans to be imbeciles.

This is the big lie, and the great disaster of politics: to place politics on one side and life on the other, on one side what is said but isn’t real and on the other what is lived but can no longer be said. […] Hell is really the place where all speech is rendered meaningless.

What is revealed in every political eruption is the irreducible human plurality, the unsinkable heterogeneity of ways of being and doing – the impossibility of the slightest totalization.

The Invisible Committee, Now, Semiotext(e), 2017

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Scholia

avoiding becoming embittered by interminable debates going nowhere

Regular readers tell me they have difficulty sometimes with my philosophical jargon and all these isms. Some have suggested I provide notes, a glossary or some other explanatory device.

Since my retirement and with the complex incapacitations of chemotherapy, I have had time on my hands, so I have been writing this story about my journey, which I thought might help readers understand a little better where I am coming from.

It is a little longer than I anticipated and a wee bit more detailed, but if you are sitting comfortably, I shall begin. Continue reading “Scholia”

Dangerously Naïve

Adding a bit of hard reality to the politics of our times.

I have never been in any doubt that the British State is capable of any act that will ensure its preservation. Now is the time to hold this in mind, to remember that the road to independence is not about asking permission to hold another referendum, that democracy is a complex game we play to pretend power is benevolent.

Random Public Journal

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By Jason Michael

NIETZSCHE NEVER FAILS to unnerve his readers. His nihilistic philosophy of the human condition and the will to power do not make for easy reading. “Uncle Friedrich,” said my Ethics professor, “spells out for us what drives us when we are unencumbered by the gods.” Man, as the final arbiter of his own morality is a monster. He is capable of anything; no achievement and no depth of depravity is beyond him. This was precisely what Dostoyevsky meant in The Brothers Karamazov when he wrote: “Without God, without an afterlife, in the end, it will be that everything is allowed, anything can be done?” In Beyond Good and Evil (1886) Nietzsche writes of the soul gazing into the darkness and the darkness looking back – not the most pleasant thought for anyone afraid of the dark, but his point is simple; the abyss of the…

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